Marketer

I shadowed an assistant brand manager and Johnson & Johnson who is in charge of all of the marketing of their baby products. These products include the popular Johnson’s baby shampoo and their baby powder. The office seemed new and had a cool feel to it since it was open concept and the employees looked like they were having fun while working. When not enjoying the office, the manager I shadowed is in charge of researching competitive products, market direction, and consumer demands. After understanding the product (in this case Johnson’s baby products), the manager works closely with agencies that make ads, websites, run Facebook pages, and create other promotional materials to hopefully increase sales.

One thing I thought was really cool that day was looking at Nielsen data. Nielsen data is information compiled by the firm Nielsen Media Research and they sell their information to all sorts of companies. These reports are very informative and the brand manager can use this to differentiate their brand, understand their consumer, and forecast sales. It was fun looking at the in depth reports. I can’t believe all the research that is being done on what we buy. 

Overall, being a brand manager is a job that requires creativity and analytical skills. You have to be able to understand consumers and the marketplace which requires a lot of work and research. It was interesting day. 

A Typical Day

On a daily basis a marketer researches market trends, competitive products, and works for other strategies to promote their product.

Top 3 Perks

1) Your always working on new products and working to achieve new goals 

2) Technology is allowing marketers to track consumer behaviour accurately 

3) Great open space modern offices and culture
 

Job Culture

Indoors, using comptuers, analyzing data and graphs, creating presentations, working with agencies, lots of meetings, reading report

Requirements

1) A business degree

Skills Needed

Communication, analytical skills, creativity, ability to read people, listening


The Field

- Field and job opportunities are heavily dependent on economy 

- New data and research are allowing marketers to understand consumers even more